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  • Introducing JetBrains dotPeek

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dotPeek provides the Assembly Explorer to traverse the list of opened assemblies. Expanding an assembly node lists namespaces within the assembly that can be further expanded to types and type members, as well as assembly references.

In addition, the Assembly Explorer contains nodes representing base types and inheritors of the current type. This is a way to browse type inheritance trees that developers with Reflector background usually find appealing. However, dotPeek also provides a bunch of ReSharper-inspired navigation features that work not only from the Assembly Explorer but from other tool windows and from the source code view areas as well.

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To apply order to the way you work with multiple assemblies, and also to support switching between different sets of assemblies, dotPeek provides assembly lists. You can now work with different assembly lists depending on your context. You can save and reopen assembly lists, and or clear the current list if you no longer need it.

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Assembly lists are not limited to .dll and .exe files: they can contain all supported file types (including archives) and folders.

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windows_explorer
windows_explorer

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This is accomplished in two different ways depending on the type of dotPeek distribution that you're using.

If you're installing deploying dotPeek using the installer, Windows Explorer integration is set using the installation wizard.

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Use Navigate > Go to Type (Ctrl+T) to navigate to a specific class or interface. You type in the name of the type you want to find, and dotPeek searches for a match within all loaded assemblies. Here again, the concept of CamelHumps is applicable - you don't need to type DynamicMethodGenerator DatasetMethodGenerator to open this class - typing dmg is enough:

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Decompiled code is better than nothing (especially if it's decompiled with dotPeek) but sometimes you want to explore an assembly exactly the way it had been originally written, and be able to read comments its developers have made. Sometimes dotPeek can help with that: it is able to get symbol information and recreate source code from Microsoft Reference Source Center and SymbolSource.org. You can try calling Navigate > Navigate To > Sources from Symbol Files on a type or member and see if symbol information for this particular assembly is available. You can even go as far as make downloading symbol files the default action for Go to declaration - to do that go to Tools > Options > Decompiler and select Allow downloading from remote locations.

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Use the navigation mode drop-down in the menu bar to choose whether you only want dotPeek to decompile assemblies, or try find source code if possible.

Keyboard-Driven Navigation Between Tool Windows

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