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  • Introducing JetBrains dotPeek

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dotPeek decompiles any .NET assemblies and presents them as C# code. Both libraries (.dll) and applications (.exe) can be opened via in one of the following ways:

  • Using the File > Open assembly command.

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  • Via drag-and-drop of a file (or a selection of files) to dotPeek window.
  • By double-clicking a file in Windows Explorer. To enable Windows Explorer integration, choose Tools > Options, and select Integrate with Windows Explorer under Environment > General.

In addition, assemblies from Global Assembly Cache can be opened via File > Open from GAC. One thing to note about the Open from GAC dialog is that you can batch-select assembly items there, and you can also filter out assemblies by entering their CamelHumps - the capitals that different parts of assembly names start with. For example, to find all assemblies with names containing Microsoft.VisualStudio.Modeling in the list of GAC assemblies, you can type mvsm:

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We've already covered Go to Derived Symbols and Go to Base Symbols above but these two features are useful when you want to go to an inheritor or a base symbol right away. What if you're looking to plainly get an overview of a certain inheritance chain? That's where the Type Hierarchy view comes handy: press Ctrl+Alt+H on a usage of any type, and dotPeek will show you all types that are inherited from it, as well as types that it inherits itself - as a tree view, in a separate tool window.

Goodness doesn't end here, though: you can select nodes in the tool window, rebase hierarchies on them; show or hide previews of type members; and switch between several hierarchy views: for example, you can opt to only show subtypes or supertypes of a given type.

Reference Hierarchy

A derivative of Type Hierarchy, the Reference Hierarchy tool window shows which references the current assembly has, allowing you to track down all its dependencies, and additionally showing recursive dependencies with a glyph to the right of a reference entry.

If you click Referencing projects in the tool window’s toolbar, you can see which of the assemblies in your current assembly list reference the current selected assembly.
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Downloading Source Code from Source Servers

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