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Comment: Migrated to Confluence 4.0

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If you need to move existing TeamCity installation to a new hardware or clean OS, it is recommended to follow instructions on copying the server from one machine to another and then switch from the old server to a new one. If you are sure you do not need the old server data you can probably perform move operations instead of copying.

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However, if you need to use another server address, you will need:

  • Switch agents to new URL (requires updating serverUrl property in buildAgent.properties on each agent).
  • Upon new server startup do not forget to update Server URL on Server configuration administration page.
  • Notify all TeamCity users to use the new address

Move TeamCity Agent

Apart from the binaries, TeamCity agent stores it's configuration and data left from the builds it run. Usually the data from the previous builds makes preparation for the future builds a bit faster, but it can be deleted if necessary.
The configuration is stored under conf and launcher\conf directories.
The data collected by previous build is stored under work and system directories.

The most simple way to move agent installation into a new machine or new location is to:

  • stop existing agent
  • install a new agent
  • copy conf/buildAgent.properties from the old installation to a new one
  • start the new agent.

With these steps the agent will be recognized by TeamCity server as the same and will perform clean checkout for all the builds.

Please also review the section for a list of directories that can be deleted without affecting builds consistency.

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h3. Integrate with Wiki

You can use [external status widget|Configuring General Settings#addingStatusWidget] to incorporate information about a build status into any HTML page.

For example, to include the status widget into a Confluence page, ensure you have XXX plugin installed that will allow to include HTML snippets into any page and use markup like (do not forget to replace _<values>_:

{code}
{{include-html}}
<style type="text/css">
 @import" <TeamCity_server_URL>/css/status/externalStatus.css";
</style>
<script type="text/javascript" src="<TeamCity_server_URL>/externalStatus.html?js=1&buildTypeId=<buildConfigurationId1>&buildTypeId=<buildConfigurationId2>&buildTypeId=<buildConfigurationId3>">
</script>
{{include-html}}
{code}

TeamCity allows user to display information about current status of a build configuration on a Confluence Wiki page (as well as on any other web-page) [via the external status widget|Configuring General Settings#addingStatusWidget].

{note}Please beware that any information about build configuration published with the external status widget is available for *any* viewer of the page where you've integrated the widget.{note}

Please note that to integrate status widget into the Confluence page or another Wiki page you should have a macros or plugin which allows to insert plain HTML code into the page. For example, in Confluence you can use {{include-html}} macro.
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Anchor
sharebuildnumber
sharebuildnumber

Share the build number for builds in a chain build

AnchorsharebuildnumbersharebuildnumberSuppose you have build configurations A and B that you want to build in sync: use same sources and take the same build number.
Solution:

  1. Create a build configuration C, then snapshot dependencies: A on C and B on C.
  2. Set the Build number format in A and B to:
    Code Block
    %dep.<btID>.system.build.number%
    
    Where <btID> is the internal ID of the build configuration C. Please refer to the Build Configuration page for description of how to determine build configuration ID.

This reference is also available if you use artifact dependencies instead of snapshot.
Read more about dependency properties.

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  • Check in the tool into the version control and use relative paths.
  • Create a separate build configuration with a single "fake" build which would contain required files as artifacts, then use artifact dependencies to send files to the target build.
  • Install and register the tool in TeamCity:
    1. Install the tool on all the agents that will run the build.
    2. Add env. or system. property into buildAgent.properties file (or add environment variable to the system).
    3. Add agent requirement for the property in the build configuration.
    4. Use the property in the build script.
  • Add environment preparation stage into the build script to get the tool form elsewhere.

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h3. Measure Coverage of my .Net Code

To measure coverage for your .Net code you can use NCover.
See [Lauren Kempe blog post on the matter|http://www.intellij.net/forums/thread.jspa?threadID=277581].
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Change Server Port

See corresponding section in server installation instructions.

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On the first start TeamCity displays Administrator Setup page. TeamCity installation should always have a user with System Administrator role in the current authentication scheme.

In rare cases on user authorization scheme switch there can be no System Administrator on the system. In this case you may setup one as follows:

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See also notes when switching from one authentication scheme to another.

If there is no user account with System Administrator role in the current authentication scheme, you can use http://<your_TeamCity_server>/setupAdmin.html

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URL to setup administrator account.
If there is an administrator account in the current authentication scheme, the page is not available and you need to remember the administrator account credentials.

If you forgot Administrator password and use internal database, you can reset the password using the instructions.
Otherwise you can use REST API to add System Administrator role to any existing user.
And here is an instruction to patch roles directly in the database provided by a user.

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Related feature requests in our tracker: TW-1964, TW-4524, TW-1681.

How do I clear build queue if it got too many builds due to a configuration error

Try pausing the build configuration that has the builds queued. On build configuration pausing all its builds are removed form the queue.
Also there is an ability to delete many builds from the build queue in a single dialog.

Anchor
hardwarerequirements
hardwarerequirements

Estimate hardware requirements for TeamCity

AnchorhardwarerequirementshardwarerequirementsThe hardware requirements differ for the server and the agents.

The agent hardware requirements are basically determined by the builds that are run. Running TeamCity agent software introduces requirement for additional CPU time (but it can usually be neglected comparing to the build process CPU requirements) and additional memory: about 150Mb500Mb. Although, you can run build agent on the same machine as the TeamCity server, the recommended approach is to use a separate machine (though, it may be virtual) for each build agent. If you chose to install several agents on the same machine, please consider possible CPU, disk, memory or network bottlenecks that might occur.

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Info
  • If you decide to run external database at the same machine with the server, consider hardware requirements with database engine requirements in mind.
  • If you face some TeamCity-related Performance issues, they should probably be investigated and addressed individually. e.g. if builds generate too much data, server disk system might need upgrade both by size and speed characteristics.

Database Note:
When using the server extensively, database performance starts to play greater role.
For reliability and performance reasons you should use external database.
Please see notes on choosing external database.

Overview on the TeamCity hardware resources usage:

  • CPU: TeamCity utilizes multiple cores of the CPU, so increasing number of cores makes sense. It is probably not necessary to dedicate more

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  • than 8 cores to TeamCity server.
  • Memory: See a note on memory usage. Consider also that required memory may depend on the JVM used (32 bit or 64 bit). You will probably not need to dedicate more

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  • than 4G of memory to TeamCity server.
  • HDD/disk usage: This sums up from the temp directory usage (<TeamCity home>/temp and OS temp directory) and .BuildServer/system usage. Performance of the TeamCity server highly depends on the disk system performance. As TeamCity stores large amounts of data under .BuildServer/system (most notably, VCS caches and build results) it is important that the access to the disk is fast. (e.g. please pay attention to this if you plan to store the data directory on a network drive).
  • Network: This mainly sums up from the traffic from VCS servers, to clients (web browsers, IDE, etc.) and to/from build agents (send sources, receive build results, logs and artifacts).

The load on the server depends on:

  • number of build configurations;
  • number of builds in the history;
  • number of the builds running daily;
  • amount of data generated by the builds (size of the build log, number and output size of unit tests, number of inspections and duplicates hits etc.);
  • cleanup rules configured
  • number of agents and their utilization percentage;
  • number of users having TeamCity web pages open;
  • number of users logged in from IDE plugin;
  • number and type of VCS roots as well as checking for changes interval for the VCS roots. VCS checkout mode is relevant too: server checkout mode generates greater server load. Specific types of VCS also affect server load, but they can be roughly estimated based on native VCS client performance;
  • number of changes detected by TeamCity per day in all the VCS roots;
  • total size of the sources checked out by TeamCity daily.

Based on our experience, a modest hardware like 3.2 dual core CPU, 3.2Gb memory under Windows, 1Gb network adapter can provide acceptable performance for the following setup:

  • 60 projects and 300 build configurations (with one forth being active and running regularly);
  • more

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  • than 300 builds a day;
  • about 2Mb log per build;
  • 50 build agents;
  • 50 web users and 30 IDE users;
  • 100 VCS roots (mainly Perforce and Subversion using server checkout), average checking for changes interval is 120 seconds;
  • more

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  • than 150 changes per day;
  • the database (MySQL) is running on the same machine, main TeamCity process has -Xmx1100m -XX:MaxPermSize=120m JVM settings.

However, to ensure peak load can be handled well, more powerful hardware is recommended.

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Please also ensure that the distribution of the backup server is of exactly the same version as the main server.

See also information on switching from one server to another.

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If you need a level of automation and web administration UI does not suite your needs, there are two possibilities:

Attach Cucumber reporter to Ant build

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The build number will be returned as a plain-text response.
For <internal ID of build configuration>, see Build Configuration.
This functionality is provided by REST API

Anchor
copy_server
copy_server

Create a copy of TeamCity server with all data

Anchorcopy_servercopy_serverOne of the ways to create a copy of the server is to create a backup, then install a new TeamCity server of the same version that you already run, ensure you have appropriate environment configured, ensure that the server uses own TeamCity Data Directory and own database and then restore the backup.
This way , the new server will not won't get build artifacts , so if and some other less important data. If you need them, you will need to copy appropriate directories (e.g. "artifacts") from .BuildServer/system/artifacts from the original server to the copied server.

If you do not want to use bundled backup functionality or need manual control over the process, here is a description of the general steps you will usually one would need to make perform to manually create copy of the server:

  1. create a backup so that you can restore it if anything goes wrong,
  2. ensure the server is not running,
  3. either perform clean installation or copy TeamCity binaries (TeamCity home directory) into the new place (temp and work subdirectories can be omitted during copying). (warning) Use exactly the same TeamCity version. If you plan to upgrade after copying, perform the upgrade only after you have existing version up and running.
  4. transfer relevant environment if it was specially modified for existing TeamCity installation. This might include:
    • if you run TeamCity with OS startup (e.g. Windows service), make sure all the same configuration is performed on the new machine
    • use the same TeamCity process launching options
    • use appropriate OS user account for running TeamCity server process with appropriately configured settings, global and file system permissions
    • transfer OS security settings if required
    • ensure any files/settings that were configured in TeamCity web UI are accessible; put necessary libraries/files inside TeamCity installation if they were put there earlier)
  5. copy TeamCity Data Directory. If you do not need the full copy, refer to the items below for optional items.
    • .BuildServer/config to preserve projects and build configurations settings
    • .BuildServer/lib and .BuildServer/plugins if you have them
    • files from the root of .BuildServer/system
    . The file license.keys contains license key, and you can copy it only if you make the copy for backup/evaluation purposes. See also "Licensing issues" below.
    • if you use internal database and you do not want to perform database move.
    • .BuildServer/system/messages (optional) if you want build logs (including tests failure details) preserved on the new server
    • .BuildServer/system/artifacts (optional) if you want build artifacts preserved on the new server
    • .BuildServer/system/changes (optional) if you want personal changes preserved on the new server
    • .BuildServer/system/pluginData (optional) if you want to preserve state of various plugins and build triggers
    • .BuildServer/system/caches and .BuildServer/system/caches (optional) are not necessary to copy to the new server, they will be recreated on startup, but can take some time to be rebuilt (expect some slow down).
  6. create copy of the database that your TeamCity installation is using in new schema or new database server
  7. configure new TeamCity installation to use proper TeamCity Data Directory and database (.BuildServer/config/database.properties points to a copy of the database)

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  1. ensure the new server is configured to use another data directory and the database then the original server
    At this point you should be ready to run the copy TeamCity server.
  2. run new TeamCity server
  3. upon new server startup do not forget to update Server URL on Server configuration administration page. You will also probably need to modify Email and Jabber notification sending settings to prevent new server from sending out notifications
  4. if you need the services on the copied server check that email, jabber and VCS servers are accessible from the new installation.
  5. install new agents (or select some form the existing ones) and configure them to connect to the new server (using new server URL)

See also the notes on moving the server from one machine to another.

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It's advised to try new TeamCity version before upgrading your production server. Usual procedure is to create a copy of your production TeamCity installation, then upgrade it, try the things out and when everything is checked, drop the test server and upgrade the main one.

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If you choose to install 64 bit OS, TeamCity can run under 64 bit JDK (both server and agent).
However, unless you need to provide more then than 1Gb memory for TeamCity, the recommended approach is to use 32 bit JVM even under 64 bit OS. Our experience suggests that using 64 bit JVM does not increase performance a great deal. At the same time it does increase memory requirements to almost the scale of 2. See a note on memory configuration.

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  1. Write a build script that will perform the deployment task for the binary files available on the disk. (e.g. use Ant for this)
  2. Create a build configuration in TeamCity that will execute the build script.
  3. In this build configuration configure artifact dependency on a build that produces binaries that need to be deployed
  4. Configure one of the available triggers if you need the deployment to be triggered automatically (e.g. to deploy last successful of last pinned build), or use "Promote" action in the build that produces the binaries that need to be deployed.
  5. If you need to parametrize the deployment (e.g. specify different target machines in different runs), pass parameters to the build script using custom build run dialog.
    You can also use a build number from the build that generated the artifact.

Integrating with Reporting/Metric Tools

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For advanced integration, a custom plugin will be necessary to store and present the data as required. See Developing TeamCity Plugins for more information on plugin development.



























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