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{panel:title=(!) Permissions note}To access and configure Domain Settings you must have _Low-Level Administrator Permissions_.{panel}

h2. Obtaining Custom Domain Name for YouTrack InCloud Instance

# Register your domain name. To do so, you can use any available domain registering service to your liking, for example [http://godaddy.com].
# Provide CNAME record for your YouTrack InCloud instance. A CNAME record, or Canonical Name record, is a type of resource record in the Domain Name System (DNS) that specifies that the domain name is an alias of another, canonical domain name. For example, a CNAME record like this:
{code}
myyoutrack.com. CNAME myyoutrack.myjetbrains.com.
{code}
may be read as:
{{myyoutrack.com}} is an alias for the canonical name (CNAME) {{myyoutrack.myjetbrains.com}}.
# In YouTrack, open *Administration > Domain Settings* page
# To set custom domain name, you should change the "{{Base URL}}" parameter: Click the link below the 'Base URL' field, and type the custom name that you specified in your CNAME record.
{panel}(!) Please note that the 'Base URL' must have '{{/youtrack}}' tail, for example, {{http://myyoutrack.com/youtrack}}{panel}
# When done, click the 'Save' button. Please note that applying the new URL is taking some time, and be patient.


h2. Using SSL for the Custom Domain

# Register your desired custom domain name
# Configure relation for your custom domain name and the CNAME of your YouTrack InCloud instance
# Buy a SSL certificate. {note:title=Important!}Certificate(s) must be provided in x.509 PEM format. {note}
# Access your YouTrack via HTTPS and open the *Administration > Domain Settings* page.
# Set custom domain name: Click the link below the 'Base URL' field, and type the custom name that you specified in your CNAME record.
{panel}(!) Please note that for secure access the 'Base URL' should start with 'https://' and must have '{{/youtrack}}' tail, for example, {{https://myyoutrack.com/youtrack}}{panel}
# Provide your *SSL Private Key* and *Certificate* in the corresponding fields. Both key and certificates must be provided in PEM format. If you have several certificates, provide them consequently one after another, each certificate starting on a new line.

When the settings are applied, your server will have both HttP an HTTPS access enabled.

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Про CNAME

A CNAME record or Canonical Name record is a type of resource record in the Domain Name System (DNS) that specifies that the domain name is an alias of another, canonical domain name. This helps when running multiple services (like an FTP server and a webserver; each running on different ports) from a single IP address. Each service can then have its own entry in DNS (like ftp.example.com. and www.example.com.). Network administrators also use CNAMEs when running multiple HTTP servers on the same port, with different names, on the same physical host.

Details

CNAME records are specified in RFC 1034. CNAME records are handled specially in the domain name system, and have several restrictions on their use. When a DNS resolver encounters a CNAME record while looking for a regular resource record, it will restart the query using the canonical name instead of the original name. (If the resolver is specifically told to look for CNAME records, the CNAME alias is returned, rather than restarting the query.) The canonical name that a CNAME record points to can be anywhere in the DNS, whether local or on a remote server in a different DNS zone.
For example, if there is a DNS zone as follows:
foo.example.com. CNAME bar.example.com.
bar.example.com. A 192.0.2.23
When an A record lookup for foo.example.com is done, the resolver will see a CNAME record and restart the checking at bar.example.com and will then return 192.0.2.23.
[TSYS:edit]Which is the "CNAME"?
RFC 2181, "Clarifications to the DNS Specification", includes a warning on the use of the word "CNAME". "The CNAME" or "a CNAME" is often used to refer to the label, or left-hand part, of a CNAME record. However, as "CNAME" is an abbreviation of "canonical name", this usage is inaccurate; the label is an alias for the right-hand side (the RDATA portion), which is (or should be) a canonical name.[1] In other words, a CNAME record like this:
foo.example.com. CNAME bar.example.com.
may be read as:
foo.example.com is an alias for the canonical name (CNAME) bar.example.com.
The canonical name itself must be defined by a record other than a CNAME or DNAME record.
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